PhD Study

Global Studies at RMIT accommodates a wide range of higher degree by research topics. We specialise in topics concerning development contexts, international strategic security and diplomacy, social movements, and the impacts of globalisation. 

To discover more about the specific areas of research expertise amongst our staff, view their individual profiles here

To apply to do a PhD with us, and for scholarship information, click here


Some of our PhD candidates and their research

Aya Ono conducted her research on social impact investment as a next driver of sustainable global development. She has so far conducted the field research with social impact investors in Japan to explore their motivations of impact-investing, expectations around financial returns, risks, and experiences of social impact investment in a Japanese context, to identify the potential of social impact investment as an innovative approach of resource mobilisation in the realm of global development finance. Aya was supervised by Associate Professor Paul Battersb, Dr Reina Ichii and Associate Professor Jose Roberto Guavara while Dr Ichii is on maternity leave.


Kent Goldsworthy's research into the Commodification of Good Intentions was undertaken to account for the prevalence of opportunities available to citizen-consumers of the developed Global North to relate to those of the developing Global South. The research aimed to show how market globalisation facilitates those opportunities, and how the relationships manifest themselves. Kent was supervised by Associate Professor Yaso Nadarajah and, at various times, Dr Ravi Roy, Dr Jonathan Makuwira and Associate Professor Kim Humphery.


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Hang Nguyen conducted a research on US policy towards European integration under the Nixon administration. Using the newly released documents and recently declassified conversations at the Nixon Presidential Library, she argued that despite the redefining of US policy to European political and economic integration, US promotion for this process between 1969 and 1974 continued to be strong. By arguing against a “hands-off” approach in US policy towards European integration under the Nixon administration, the research helps to prevent the misunderstanding that there was a discontinuation in the United States’ supports for moves to European integration and draw some lessons for the policy making circles of the nations in relations with the United States and the European Union. Hang was supervised by Professor Joe Siracusa and Professor Bruce Wilson.


Gregoire Nimbtik conducted his research in Vanuatu and examined sources of corruption within Vanuatu Government and society. His research mapped out layers of customary practice and authority in Vanuatu and highlighted the ways in which their adoption into the modern structures of government has enabled official corruption. His research has also provided proposals for ways in which this corruption can be addressed. Gregoire was supervised by Associate Professor Paul Battersby and Dr Julian CH Lee. His thesis was passed in 2016. 


 

Anita Samardzija researched the construction of contemporary national identity in Serbia. She conducted fieldwork in Belgrade to examine the way Serbs are being portrayed, particularly in the context of the state's attempt at European Union integration. Anita was supervised by Dr Peter Phipps, Associate Professor Kim Humphery and Associate Professor Hariz Halilovich.